Beneficial Insects, or the “good bugs” vs pesticides to keep you and your garden healthy all year long.

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We get asked all the time if beneficial insects truly work when it comes to keeping pesky mites and insects off food grade plants. The answer is yes! We’re not saying it’s a quick fix. But with a little bit of patience and a watchful eye, it is worth the wait and certainly much easier on your time and bank account.

Plus, you are not putting nasty chemicals on plants people are going to eat! Pesticides are used almost everywhere these days and very freely. They can be found in our yards, parks, schools and homes. They are sprayed from crop dusting planes to tiny cans under our kitchen sinks.

Recent studies have found that pesticides can be linked to a number of health issues, ranging from short-term symptoms like headaches and nausea to chronic conditions such as cancer, reproductive issues, and brain dysfunction.

It may take years for symptoms to develop either from environmental exposure or from the foods we’ve ingested.

In 2007 a study was conducted by 3 groups – UC Berkeley School of Public Heath, Public Health Institute and the California Department of Health Services. The conclusion? They found a large increase of risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) for children of women who were exposed to pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds with chlorinated aromatic molecules.

Pesticides have also been linked to different types of cancer such as brain, bone, breast, ovarian, prostate and liver.

Another study in 2009 showed children who lived in homes where pesticides were used were more likely to develop brain cancer than children who were not exposed.

Now are those beneficial insects looking better and better as pest control? You bet!

We greatly need to clean up our food source and environment. Stop using harmful pesticides, which will encourage the good bugs to come back to your crops and gardens.

To kick start your beneficial insects contact Brad the Bugman at 800.328.9140.